BASED IN CALGARY, CANADA, kenhoffmanlearning IS A BLOG BY SCIENCE, MATH AND MUSIC EDUCATOR KEN HOFFMAN. THESE POSTS PROVIDE INSIDE INTO CURRENT TRANFORMATIONS TO PUBLIC SECONDARY EDUCATION, WITH A SPECIFIC FOCUS ON STUDENT IDENTITY AND THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON IDENTITY FORMATION.

Part 4: Cloudroom vs. Classroom

Not only must a student be aware of the origins of digital media, but they must also be aware of emerging trends and where the media is headed.  Digital media are driven by information technology: we are all experientially aware of Moore’s Law through the ever-increasing speed and decreasing size of our personal digital devices and the concomitant acceleration of the advancement of digital technology.

Teachers need to be aware of the trends in learning through digital media so as not to be relegated – as an anthropological artifact – to the list of Walkman, Palm Pilot or Kodak.  This necessitates that a teacher not only utilize contemporary media in their classroom but also reach out to the technology that their students have embraced.  With the rapid uptake by students of hardware such as Smart Phones or Tablets and applications such as Twitter and Facebook the teacher must find ways to utilize these media in the classroom to deliver relevant and appropriate course content and engage the students in a dialogue on how the technology can be implemented to transcend its social origins and create a new paradigm for classroom learning.

Teachers must embrace the 19th Century classroom as 21st Century “cloudroom” (PR Newswire).  The role of the teacher, irrespective of subject, is as a guide to finding ways and means of achieving a student’s learning goals through the appropriate application of the student’s technological paradigm.

“New Initiative into Cloud Based Learning as Industry Reports Businesses’ Indifference.” PR Newswire Europe Including UK Disclose (2011) ProQuest Asian Business & Reference; ProQuest European Business. Web. 16 Jan. 2013.

© K.C. Hoffman and learnersinadangeroustime.wordpress.com, 2013.

Part 5: A Brief History of the Internet

Part 3: The Myth that Literacy is Fluency